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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the new york city department of cultural affairs and the sanitation department to be the artist of the largest municipal landfill on this planet -- a rather daunting challenge. slowly but surely, i realized that she was doing the art for the next century. that she was just way ahead of everybody and that she was the official artist in residence at the department of sanitation of the city of new york. and i was just baffled by this, but i couldn't get it out of my mind. hey, david, what's that? what's that over there? ukeles: working in collaboration with sanitation engineers, ecologists, and planners, i will help design what this site will become. i don't want to pretend this is solid ground. this is not solid ground. this is a social sculpture that we all made. these mounds are here because i threw out my garbage in the bronx, and you threw out your garbage in brooklyn, and maybe we made a little bit too much garbage altogether, and look what we did here. we made these mounds. the landfill is scheduled to cease accepting waste in five years. how can we heal this site and return
the only permament home that he had for the rest of his life would have been new york city. amy goodman: and talk about what being in new york meant for him. who did he meet? what was he singing? will kaufman: well, he was singing some interesting songs, first of allwriting some interesting songs, because as he was hitchhiking north and east our of texas in that bitter cold new year of 1940, all he's hearing on the radio is kate smith singing irving berlin's "god bless america." and that'sthat was the big hit of the year. and woody hated that song. kate smith: [singing] god bless america some interesting songs, because as he was hitchhiking north and eastland that i love. stand beside her, and guide her through the night with a light from above. will kaufman: now, i mean, there's two ways you can look at that song. you can look at "god bless america," written by irving berlin, all rightit's the fearful prayer, almost, of a european jewish immigrant to the united states who's nervously watching the rise of fascism in europe and praying that it won't happen over here. he actually wrote it
of these particles and these, all flying apart, is awesome. the energy that takes to light up new york city comes about as a result of water pouring over niagara falls. and every water drop has an energy of about this much, four electron volts. electron volts are tiny unit of energy. it's microscopic unit of energy, yeah? but four electron volts per water drop, tnt-- [makes sounds] --you get about 30 electron volts. high-octane gasoline, about 30 electron volts per molecule of combustion, yeah? one atom, u235, fissions, you get about 200 million electron volts of energy. awesome, awesome. an awful lot of energy for one atom, and that kinda changed the world. and so we now talk about the atomic age or more properly the nuclear age because we're talking about an awful lot of energy for just a little bit of matter. it turns out the most common isotopic uranium is uranium-- let me try it over here-- uranium 238. and when 238 catches a neutron, what it does is it turns to u239. u238 emits alpha particles, but 239 emits beta particles. and guess what the 239 does, gang? it turns into an element beyond
this is an historical fact which yip himself saysbroadway and the american theater in new york city was the only place where an artist could stand up and say whatever he wanted, provided he got the money to put the show on. so, for finian's rainbow, they had to have 25 auditions, because they said it was a commie red thing. and finally, they got the money up, and they put the show up. but by that time, yip was blacklisted. and his next show was jamaica with lena horne, with an all- black cast. one other thing, in terms of yip's drive for race or ethnic equality, and that is that finian's rainbow in 1947 was the first show on broadway where the chorus line consisted of blacks and whites who danced with each other, and the chorus was an integrated affair. amy goodman: what happened to him during the mccarthy era? ernie harburg: well, he could not work on any major film that they wanted him to work on from the major studios in hollywood. the setup was that roy brewer, who was the head of the iatse unioni'm sorry to say thatwas the one who amy goodman: what do you mean? ernie harburg: well, i mean this is
veterans waiting to, and these wait times are getting longer and longer. in city like new york, chicago, los angeles, san francisco, veterans are waiting over a year to get compensation for their wartime wounds. so the question becomes, why are there such egregious delays? what we found in this more recent investigation was that these delays paradoxically exist because the va is putting pressure on people like jimmy foxx to rush through quickly and then they make a mistake, and then the veterans who are wrongfully deniedso the questioe there such egregious delays? what we found enter appeal. almost a third of veterans waiting are waiting on an appeal. we found the board of veterans' appeals rules that the va makes a mistake 73% of the time that they will on the case. >> tell us the story of hosea roundtree. in this video report, he talks about why he filed his claims with the veterans affairs. >> it is not just for me but for every other veteran out their suffering. it is for every other vet coming home, that they will see a difference. i want them to get better treatment. >> explain hi
model of urbanism. imitating the forms of chicago and new york, sao paulo built upward,gro. but in a huge ring around ty slies a very different,gro. urban environment. here, stretchingoriles, is a city of self-built structures in various stages of completion. they line hillsides and rocky streets where some of sao paulo's newest immigrants struggo build mes om brick and cen where some of sao paulo's alaide and her family came to sao paulo from northeastern brazil. ( alaide speaking portuguese ) translator: from there my father came first to work. came i as a maid,my motwas amsts narrator:alaide mar, a northeaste mignt ke herse. they coun't afford even mar, the cheapestenthcity, so they decided to bui a home on unclaimed land on the outskirts of sao paulo. they began building this house when their first daughtewas. 11 years ago, ( alaide saking uguese ) they began building this house whentranslator:t daughtewas. whenhe was eightonths old, we moved to th house. first we me three rooms... then wrent them out to hp things a bit. we then builfo rooms on top, and that's wher
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)